The Power of Saying No

Say no concept.Two-year-olds have it down pat. They know how to say “No!” with gusto and without apology. By the time we start school, however, a lot of that natural inclination to say “No!” is trained out of us, and we spend the rest of lives saying “Yes!”

So what’s so powerful about this little two-letter word? Saying “No!” gives us the power to stop doing things that are not in our best interest. According to life coach Danielle Laporte, what we stop doing is just as important as what we start doing.  As I consider Weekend Retirement,  I can think of a few things I need to stop doing, things I need to say “No!” to:

  • Using television as my default entertainment when there are so many other more worthwhile activities I want to do
  • Waiting until I have a huge block of time before I start cleaning the garage
  • Limiting my reading list to nonfiction works

Cheryl Richardson, life coach and author of Take Time for Your LIfe, advises clients to use the Absolute Yes test. When presented with a decision about how to use your time, if you can’t respond with an Absolute Yes, then say “No!” When you say “No!” to those things that are not your highest priority, you are making space for what is really important.

You can apply this concept to relationships, your home and work environments, your health, your spirituality, the work you do, and what you do with your money.

Travel blogger Ryan Holiday applies the concept of saying “No!” in a number of ways when he travels. He says “No!” to:

  • Checking luggage (he manages with a carry-on)
  • Reclining his seat on the airplane (he says it may provide more comfort for him, but at the expense of the person behind him)
  • Packing things he “might” need (he says to just buy it there if you really need it)

Laporte uses the concept when talking about life goals. She suggests these questions when making a determination:

  • Am I passionate about this?
  • Do I feel like I’m “made” to do it?
  • Can I make a living at it?

She says if the answers are not a resounding “Yes!” then you can take it off your list and move toward what you’d really like to do.

What are some things you need to say “No!” to?

-G.

 

 

More on Giving Back

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More Reasons to Have Fun on the Weekend

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Do you ever find yourself so frazzled by the end of the work week that all you want to do is collapse on the weekend? In order to fully take advantage of the Weekend Retirement concept, you need the energy to do the things on your list. In this week’s post, I’m sharing tips from…

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As we look forward to a time when we bid adieu to full-time employment (and the paycheck that goes with it), we can begin now to explore ways to supplement our income in retirement. If you want to do something with your time that feeds a passion and, as author Barbara Winter says, “makes a difference to…

Meet Gail

Gail Pentz, author

My work experience spans Fortune 500 companies to nonprofits. As a corporate trainer, I have delivered training throughout the U.S. and in 18 other countries. I designed and wrote hundreds of instructional materials for numerous industries, and worked as a teacher and staff in private schools. I also have experience with small businesses. I was a founding partner and Director of Operations for T.W.I.C.E. Educational Services, Inc., a Sarasota-based continuing education firm serving mental health professionals.

Having worked 60+ hours a week for several decades, I know what it’s like to be on the proverbial hamster wheel, using weekends to catch up on what I didn’t get done and preparing for the week ahead. Like me, you may be ready for at least two days each week that are filled with activities you find satisfying and fulfilling. Less time working (or preparing for work) translates into more time for recreational travel, self-care, and personal development. I firmly believe that as we take better care of ourselves, we are better equipped to share our gifts with the world (and especially the quality of effort we bring to the workplace).

You can begin enjoying a retirement lifestyle this weekend. Let’s get started!

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