Using Experiments to Reinvent Your Work Life

研究イメージRather than making one cataclysmic change in our work lives, we Boomers can  investigate possible new scenarios by performing small experiments. Try something–evaluate it–try a variation of it. At this stage of the game, we do not have to search for our one true self but consider all the many selves we could be.

In her book Retire Retirement, Tamara Erickson recommends that Boomers think about what form of expression our work could take (writing, teaching, selling); something we have dreamed of doing; any charitable cause we want to support; hobbies we’d like to pursue, and unmet needs in the marketplace.

Erickson suggests that experiments follow some basic rules:

  • Be clear on what you are testing.
  • Decide on what you want to learn from the experiment.
  • Take time to debrief afterwards to discover what worked and what didn’t work or what you liked or didn’t like.
  • Know that failure is an acceptable outcome–this is one item you can cross off the list!

As we begin making our list of possible new career opportunities, Erickson says to consider:

  • A different size company. If you work for a large company, consider a smaller company.
  • Consulting opportunities
  • Something different in your current company
  • Government jobs or the public sector
  • Overseas assignments, including teaching English
  • Fields with known shortages
  • Hobbies or recreational pursuits
  • Causes we want to support
  • Local needs
  • Locations we love

The key, she says, is taking ACTION. Do more, plan less.

What’s on your list?

-G.

Using Networking to Reinvent Your Work Life

Using Networking to Reinvent Your Work Life

Considering that you may need to work into your retirement years, exploring your options may be a good first step in the process of reinventing your work life. So says Tamara Erickson, author of Retire Retirement, a book on career strategies for the Boomer Generation. A business thought leader, Erickson recommends three practices for reinvention…Continue Reading

The Cost of Inefficiency

The Cost of Inefficiency

Did you know you could put a price on the time you spend doing tasks that could be automated or delegated? Productivity expert Ari Meisel has just released a time-waster survey that calculates the cost in dollars and cents. Go to his website and take the survey to find out. Meisel covers the top nine areas…Continue Reading

How to be a Superhero

How to be a Superhero

This past week I watched an episode of “Grey’s Anatomy” that introduced me to the brain science behind superhero behavior. On the television show, Dr. Amelia Shepherd scrubs up for an impossible surgery, and as part of her pre-surgery preparation, stands in a Wonder Woman pose for two minutes. When Steph, her resident, asks what…Continue Reading

Islands of Ease

Islands of Ease

Feeling totally exhausted at the end of a work week, I went in search of tips for rejuvenation that went beyond the usual get more sleep, take a hot bath variety of advice. What I discovered surprised me. Mary Jaksch wrote about the kind of exhaustion I was feeling in a post entitled, How to Find Islands…Continue Reading

Replace Someday with Now

Replace Someday with Now

I recently became aware of a motivational website called The Daily Motivator. Written by Ralph Marston, this website provides a kind of daily philosophical pep talk that focuses on what is positive in life. I liked Marston’s messages so much that I read his book, The Power of Ten Billion Dreams. One chapter especially spoke…Continue Reading

Make Space for Your Dreams

Make Space for Your Dreams

Today’s post includes helpful tips from blogger Ruth Soukup’s book, 31 Days to a Clutter-free Life. Soukup regularly writes on lifestyle issues in her blog, LivingWellSpendingLess.com. Her book outlines a process for clearing space in your home, from the entry way and living room to bedrooms, baths and kitchen. Each day focuses on a different…Continue Reading

Personal Effectiveness and Weekend Retirement

Personal Effectiveness and Weekend Retirement

For those of us salaried employees who need to get a certain amount of work done regardless of how long it takes, I am continually on the lookout for ways to enhance personal effectiveness, both at work and at home. This month I came across Steve Pavlina’s book, Personal Development for Smart People. Pavlina set out…Continue Reading

Tools for Persistent Problems

Tools for Persistent Problems

“What if every bad thing that’s ever happened to you–including every problem you’ve ever had–was there, in your life, to get you in touch with abilities you never knew you had? And what if there were specific procedures that led you directly to those new abilities?” Psychotherapists Phil Stutz and Barry Michels answer these questions…Continue Reading

Get Unstuck

Get Unstuck

Ever find yourself wanting something to change, but feeling a sense of inertia, unable to move forward? Business coach, speaker and author Libby Gill shares tips and strategies for breaking through limiting beliefs and moving towards one’s goals in her book, You Unstuck. Gill walks the reader through her CSE process–Clarify, Simplify, and Execute. You begin by clarifying…Continue Reading

Weekend Retirement FAQs

Weekend Retirement FAQs

Q.  How do I get started with Weekend Retirement? A. Make a list of all the kinds of things you want to do in retirement. Include Places you want to visit Hobbies you want to pursue Topics you want to explore People you want to connect with Books you want to read Projects you want…Continue Reading

Meet Gail

Gail Pentz, author

My work experience spans Fortune 500 companies to nonprofits. As a corporate trainer, I have delivered training throughout the U.S. and in 18 other countries. I designed and wrote hundreds of instructional materials for numerous industries, and worked as a teacher and staff in private schools. I also have experience with small businesses. I was a founding partner and Director of Operations for T.W.I.C.E. Educational Services, Inc., a Sarasota-based continuing education firm serving mental health professionals.

Having worked 60+ hours a week for several decades, I know what it’s like to be on the proverbial hamster wheel, using weekends to catch up on what I didn’t get done and preparing for the week ahead. Like me, you may be ready for at least two days each week that are filled with activities you find satisfying and fulfilling. Less time working (or preparing for work) translates into more time for recreational travel, self-care, and personal development. I firmly believe that as we take better care of ourselves, we are better equipped to share our gifts with the world (and especially the quality of effort we bring to the workplace).

You can begin enjoying a retirement lifestyle this weekend. Let’s get started!

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